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Around 650BC, western literature effectively began with what is still its most famous epic as well as account of the first great East-West collision — that concerning the Trojan  War. But although a chronicle of great suffering and loss occasioned by greed and pride, the Iliad is also, and much more, a story  of courage and fortitude told with unflinching directness, enormous beauty - and no gore-gloating whatever.
Homer’s account of the anger of Achilles and its consequences is above all a celebration of life lived in the shadow of fate and death, and The WCC Iliad re-tells it in short form plainly and economically, with introduction and notes to clarify what happened, to whom, and why. It also offers a glossary of heroes, gods and events mentioned in the story.
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[Insisting on working on government papers even on his deathbed in 1763, John Carteret, 2nd Earl Granville, said it "could not prolong his life to neglect his duty," quoting —  in Greek and from memory, naturally Sarpedon’s great speech making the same point in Book XII of the Iliad.]